IMMIGRATION NEGLIGENCE PUTS NAURU MOTHER AND BABY AT RISK 1

Refugee Action Coalition
>
> MEDIA RELEASE
> IMMIGRATION NEGLIGENCE PUTS NAURU MOTHER AND BABY AT RISK
>
> The Refugee Action Coalition is calling for the heavily pregnant, 34
> year-old, Kurdish asylum seeker, Hatami, to be
> urgently brought to Australia to give birth.
>
> Hatami’s diabetic pregnancy, means the welfare of herself and her baby
> is at serious risk. That risk has been dramatically increased because
> the baby is also in the breech position.
>
> It has also been revealed that the Immigration and Border Force
> Department is making urgent attempts to find a neonatologist to go to
> Nauru (as early as today, Friday 6 November) and be prepared to stay a
> week.
>
> Hatami’s husband Rashid, wrote to the IHMS and the Immigration
> Department and to detention managers Transfield on Nauru at least
> three times in September appealing for help for his wife, but his
> appeals were ignored. (Copies of letters available on request.)
>
> “The deliberate delays by the Immigration Department have put the
> lives of baby and mother at risk,” said Ian Rintoul, spokesperson for
> the Refugee Action Coalition.
> “The risks in a diabetic pregnancy are well established. To delay
> proper treatment to the point where lives are at risk is medical
> negligence of the worst kind.
>
> “Medical best-practice is a distant second to ideologically driven
> policy agenda of the Immigration Department and the minister, Peter
> Dutton. This is the second time in three weeks that Border Force
> policy has over-ridden medical advice.
>
> “Abyan, the pregnant Somali refugee’s requests for medical attention
> were also ignored for weeks. Now Border Force is playing with the life
> of another woman.
> “Hatami must be brought to Australia for the medical assistance she
> and her baby urgently need.”
>
> Hatami, her husband Rashid, and their four year old son, have been on
> Nauru since 15 May, 2014. Like most other children in the Nauru
> detention centre, their son has been diagnosed with “passive”
> tuberculosis.
>
> For more information contact Ian Rintoul 0417 275 713